Further reflections

A long time ago, when I last posted to this blog (many apologies for the extended hiatus everyone), I talked about how managers could use the concepts of reflective practice, familiar from teaching, in their own “management practice”.  I also said, during that post:

I would like to suggest that managers of language teaching organisations should therefore consider two specific courses of action. Developing the reflective skills of and building in reflective time for their staff, and, also, for themselves

I then went onto to describe how the second half of that might work. My intention then was to look at the first half in a second blog post, before life (and death) intervened and halted my blogging for a while. But now I’m (finally) back, and would like to look at that second piece – that of “Developing the reflective skills of and building in reflective time for their staff”.

Now I won’t go into great depth explaining why I think providing professional development opportunities is something that ought to be one of the top priorities for any school, I think we can take it as a given (but if anyone wants to question that assumption, I’m happy to do so at some later date).

What I will do is to assert that well-structured reflective practice is one of the best and most effective sources of professional development that exists.  It is also one of the cheapest (and while this ought not to be a deciding factor in selecting PD , let’s face it, it is unfortunately not unimportant).

Many teachers these days have a fairly good idea about how to best reflect on their practice – courses like the CELTA reference it, while the SIT TESOL Certificate (the closest US equivalent to the CELTA) is built around reflective practice. But how many teachers, faced with long hours and heavy schedules, really make the time to actually reflect on their practice?

So, a five step process to make reflection less the exception and more the norm:

  1. Run a workshop (or series of workshops) on reflective practice, covering the why, the how, and even the what.  Get people inspired by the idea of reflective practice, and give them the tools to get the most out of it.
  2. Initially set up a series of facilitated reflective practice sessions.  In such a session, teachers meet to share their experiences and work through the process themselves (with facilitator assistance).  You may find that there are some very committed reflectors in your staff – use them to help and support the others.  they can be the facilitators in such a process.  Check out the literature on this process – there’s plenty out there.
  3. Once everyone is competent and really sure of themselves and the process, then they can either stay within the facilitated session system if they wish, or find a place within their own work week to independently keep reflecting.  Working with someone is more effective than working alone, so perhaps a buddy system can be encouraged, but ultimately teachers should work out the way that works best for them.
  4. To make this as systemic as possible, I’d even go as far as to write one hour of reflective practice time into everyone’s contract.  That doesn’t mean it should be clocked in and clocked out of, just that it is clear that this is something that the organisation values, and that teachers should avail themselves of the opportunities offered in this area.  how and when people choose to take this hour is up to them (as, indeed, is whether – the hope is that having gone through a process of training and practical experience, they will in fact make sure that they make reflection part of their weekly work load)
  5. As ever, seek feedback, monitor and evaluate how this is going.  Get feedback from teachers on how the training, facilitated sessions and subsequent independent reflective practice is going.  What could be done to make it better?  Are they actually doing it?  Why/Why not?  If not, what would help them to do so? Do they feel that it’s helping their teaching?  Are there follow up/refresher trainings that could be useful? Etc etc.

Reflective practice should not replace other forms of professional development, but it should form a major part of the professional development programme of any language teaching organisation.  In order to do so, it needs to be fully integrated into the work week, and needs to be supported with training and support.

Thoughts?

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5 Responses to “Further reflections”

  1. Tweets that mention Further reflections « From Teacher to Manager -- Topsy.com Says:

    [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Sue Lyon-Jones and Chris Cotter, Andy Hockley. Andy Hockley said: Finally got around to my teacher-to-manager blog again. New post is "Further Reflections" – http://bit.ly/sPXo6 [...]

  2. Nick Jaworski Says:

    Nice to see you blogging again. I agree that reflection is one of the more important skills I want to encourage my teachers to develop.

    I’m working on getting my teachers to be more reflective right now. I’d love to see you detail this out more in future posts on what strategies you use with your teachers.

    Also, could you list a few of the books/resources that you think would be good to check out for setting up this process in workshops?

  3. Andy Hockley Says:

    Hi Nick, thanks for commenting. I can send you a couple of really nice articles on reflective practice (DM me your email via twitter), which might be helpful. I’ve done some workshops on reflective practice for teachers, which I’ve created myself, and can send you the powerpoints if you like, though that won’t give you the whole picture of the workshops. When I have a minute I’ll try and jot down some notes (you might have to remind me on that one)

    Cheers

  4. Andy Hockley’s Six Ways to Survive the Crisis through Professional Development « Six Things Says:

    [...] Like peer observation, I think most teachers know the value of reflective practice, but like observation, many don’t really know how to do it. Provide some training in reflective practice, and follow some other ideas I listed here. [...]

  5. Six Things » Blog Archive » Andy Hockley's Six Ways to Survive the Crisis through Professional Development Says:

    [...] Like peer observation, I think most teachers know the value of reflective practice, but like observation, many don’t really know how to do it. Provide some training in reflective practice, and follow some other ideas I listed here. [...]


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